A Bit Listless

This is my Mumbai Mirror piece that was published yesterday.
A good number of people in Matunga have been born here, have studied here, married in the greater Matunga area, have delivered here, have had their children go to schools here and their children seem to be continuing the same tradition. There must be a reason for this.
In David Letterman style

4 Comments

  • How about South India Concerns in List 1, and Arora Theatre in List 2

  • I agree with the second one, and I’m very ambivalent about the first.

  • varun maniar wrote:

    I happened to hit this site when I googled for Don Bosco. I was bored and sleepy early in the morning after staying up all night watch India thrash Pakistan in the 4th ODI. And I did not go to bed because I am interning this semester so I am obliged to go to work. I study in the US, so that will make things easier to understand.
    I started reading the Don Bosco article and ended up scanning through all the MATUNGAful articles eventually. You obviously dont need to guess I went to Don Bosco.
    But I am not from Matunga or the greater Matunga area, I live in Chembur. But I can partly consider myself from the Matunga area because I also went to SIES college. So, I can claim to have eaten at all the Udipis, gone to Matunga Gymkhana, play at 5 gardens, seen movies at all theatres from Cine Planet to Chitra, have plethora of friends between Sion and Dadar and navigate easily in the whole area even though I might not know the names of all the streets. I am sure there is much more to Matunga which you may experience only when you stay there, but I feel I might identify with most of them.
    Talking about gujjus and kucchis flooding Matunga, most of my friends are gujju. But what I find most interesting is the attitude of the non-gujjus (especially south-indians) towards them. Most of my non-gujju friends hate this huge population in a good way. They complain about we being too loud, unfit, spendthrifts, etc. But heart in heart they know Matunga wouldn’t be the same without these gujjus. All these non-gujju kids have gujjus as their close friends, eat gujju food all the time, pronounce lot of hindi and English words with a gujju accent, think that gujju girls are hot and that saving money on tax makes sense ultimately.
    Finally talking about Don Bosco, it is undoubtedly one of the best things that can happen to any guy who got an admission there. I feel even if Don Bosco stopped teaching, forget SSC, it would command the same respect. On hindsight, the SSC-ICSE humbug is useless. I have met a lot of ICSE students who I wish I would have never met. The school just gives you a great identity I feel and I owe a lot to that place. All one has to say is “I went to Bosco”, be it college professors, friends, girls or even her parents for that matter (Beware is what the parents will advice). I passed out three and half years back, and my brother still goes there. I am sure this is still the case, or so I want to think. Just like any Boscoite, I have had great times there, though I regret not making more friends or not participating in the extra curriculum the school offers. But, I think I am making up for it now in engineering college here. Better late than never.
    I did not know where to post all this, so I just decided to email it to you. There is obviously no purpose to this, may be you might want to pull a leaf or two as to what outsiders think of Matunga if at all someone cared. Its amazing what boredom can do to you. You have a good website.
    Thanks,
    Varun.

  • top ten reasons to live in Matunga
    I loved the pani puni that is across west view. I have been in US for 15 years but every time I visit my parents in Matunga, I make a point to go and taste those pani puris on roadside. (i may suffer later 🙂
    Saraswati south indian was the best place for south indian food. I am not sure if it is still around or closed.
    Every time, I visit Matunga it brings back lot of old and good memories that I took it lightly when I was there. It saddens me that lots have changed and I feel like a stranger in my own place.

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